Gulf Coast Books

Reviews • Interviews • et Cetera

Reviews • Interviews • et Cetera

Reclaiming a Name: On Alfian Sa’at’s Malay Sketches

. . . a collection of flash fiction detailing the rich, diverse inner lives of mostly Malay Singaporeans, through which Alfian Sa’at dismantles the monolithic caricature of what a Malay is or ought to be.


Sex in a Straightjacket: Randall Mann’s Proprietary

Robert Lee Thornton

Self-described on Twitter as a “queer mutt poet,” Mann’s poetry tangles with corporate culture, queer identity, and ownership. His new collection, Proprietary (Persea Books, 2017), treads water familiar to those who have followed Mann’s work in his previous…


Micro-Review: Michael Snediker's New York Editions

Samantha Thilen

So often Snediker’s poems parse the speaker’s lone-/someness even as they parse syntactic units blown across the page. The space created in each poem is deeply felt, the absence between each word a phantom limb.


A Review of Mai Der Vang’s Afterland

Caroline M. Mar

Mai Der Vang’s debut collection, Afterland, is an unforgettable and evocative book. The poems are full of smoke and ghosts, the kinds of lingering that make history manifest. The voices of these poems cry for that history, telling and retelling the stories…


Review of The Reef by Juan Villoro

Ray Barker

Understated and wrecked, Antonio “Tony” Gongora, the 53-year old narrator of Mexican writer Juan Villor’s recent novel, The Reef, is in a suspended state of recovery: recovering from the breakup of his semi-successful rock band, Los Extraditables (as…


someone was looking for me: A Review of Blunt Research Group’s The Work-Shy

Christian Bancroft

The Blunt Research Group descended upon the literary community in the summer of 2015, veiled with mystery, intrigue, and profundity. In their author bio, it states that they are “a nameless constellation of poets, artists, and scholars from diverse backgrounds.”…


Micro-Review: Lina María Ferreira Cabeza-Vanegas’s Don’t Come Back

Sarah Hoenicke

Lina María Ferreira Cabeza-Vanegas’s series of essays, Don’t Come Back, is an exploration of belonging and of the ways memory and imagination interact to create history. Ferreira Cabeza-Vanegas reminds readers that we can still write creation narratives,…